Updated QB64 link
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QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executable and run it in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.

QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executable and run it in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.

QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executable and run it in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.
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DLosc
  • 29.6k
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#QBasic

QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executablesdownload the original executable and run themit in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.

#QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executables and run them in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.

QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executable and run it in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.
Fleshed out different options with pros and cons
Source Link
DLosc
  • 29.6k
  • 22
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#QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • For simple programsFirst, there'swhat not to use. There are a couple of online interpretersemulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! :^O=^O
  • I testrun most of my programs withon QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version, butversion; the website lists versions for Mac, Linux, and AndroidLinux as well. So far, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run into a singleQBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing I wanted to do, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in QBasic that QB64 couldn't handleor out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • IIt's also understand that it's possible to get the original executablesdownload the original executables and run them in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, though it seems like it should work.but Edit: Archive.org nowsteenbergh has a DOSBox instance running QBasic available online!had good success with it.

#QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • For simple programs, there's a couple of online interpreters, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! :^O
  • I test my programs with QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version, but the website lists versions for Mac, Linux, and Android as well. So far I have not run into a single thing I wanted to do in QBasic that QB64 couldn't handle.
  • I also understand that it's possible to get the original executables and run them in DOSBox. I haven't tried this, though it seems like it should work. Edit: Archive.org now has a DOSBox instance running QBasic available online!

#QBasic

If you don't have an old computer with DOS or pre-2000 Windows on it, you can still run QBasic programs:

  • First, what not to use. There are a couple of online emulators, but they are very limited, only supporting a subset of QBasic commands. Most importantly for this site, they don't understand syntax shortcuts that are useful for golfing! =^O
  • I run most of my programs on QB64, a free download. I've only used the Windows version; the website lists versions for Mac and Linux as well, but I can't speak for those. This is an emulator, written from scratch in C++, that compiles your QBasic code to an executable and then runs it.
    Pros: it's got most of the features of QBasic (and quite a few extras, too); you can also turn off syntax expansion, so your golfed code stays golfed.
    Cons: there are a few things from QBasic that aren't implemented, and several more that have subtle differences; some screen modes display as pretty small windows; the debugger and immediate mode aren't included, because it's a compiler not an interpreter.
  • Archive.org has made available the original QBasic running on the DOSBox emulator, meaning it's now possible to run QBasic code online.
    Pros: it's the real thing, works as advertised, no download necessary.
    Cons: you can't save your code or copy-and-paste in or out; sound works but comes across a bit wonky; and you can't turn off syntax expansion.
  • It's also possible to download the original executables and run them in DOSBox yourself. I haven't tried this, but steenbergh has had good success with it.
Added link to Archive.org's online DOSBox QBasic
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Post Made Community Wiki by Dennis
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