3 added 1 character in body
source | link

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to train obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to train obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to train obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.

2 edited body
source | link

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to studytrain obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to study obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to train obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.

1
source | link

I didn't think i would answer this question but it seems to me that 2 benefits of this site have not been mentioned in the other answers:

  • this site as a place to study programming languages comparatively;
  • this site as a place to study obfuscation/deobfuscation.

A little bit of background: i am not a programmer nor did i ever learn computer science formally. I am a micropaleontologist (I study fossil plankton), so learning programming was not exactly part of my cursus, as you would imagine. Yet I do need to program on an every day basis as my field of study entered the age of 'big data', and that modelling is taking an increasing importance in what we're doing. So naturally I learned R and trained on stackoverflow (first reading then answering), which helped me transition from beginner to advanced user. Later (3 years ago) I joined PPCG, which helped me transition to expert user: in particular, golfing taught me the inner working of R and how to control side effects of functions.

Tags like and also taught me a lot about obfuscation, and therefore, maybe more interestingly, about deobfuscation. Again, i am no professional programmer, but i can only imagine that it has to have some useful applications (in computer security first probably). For me, as i became involuntarily the R programming helpdesk in my institute, it helped me considerably in disentangling codes that were passed and modified by generations of researchers having little understanding of the tool they were using.

Tags like and , typically, are also polyglots, gathering answers in many different languages, solving the same task, often with similar algorithms. As I said, i never had any formal training in programming. Yet today I not only program, in the context of my research, in R but also in Python and, maybe more interestingly, i do not program in C, Java and Fortran but I am able to read code written in those languages and replicate them in R or Python if needed (it happened to me recently with a software written in Java and a routine written in Fortran that I needed to modify to adapt them to my research and therefore rewrote in Python and R, respectively).

I didn't mention the place that esoteric languages occupy on this site before, but they did, for me, benefit as I, as i said before, have no formal training in computer science, they helped me understand how programming languages work on a more basic and fundamental level.