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I recently saw that someone had edited an answer chaining question to have . At first I balked at that, and after checking the first page of , I confirmed my original thought that challenges usually don't have another winning criteria, which led me to believe that it was a winning criteria in and of itself.

My question is: is a fully self-contained winning criteria tag, or does it need another tag for its winning criteria (which will usually be , but may, for example, be ": shortest answer which is also a valid answer in the chain wins").

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It depends:

If the question is :

  • Scored based off of the chain, then the tag is self-contained. For example, scoring by the last answer (or second to last answer).

  • Scored based off of something else, and the chain is a restriction, then the tag is not self-contained.

Programmer5000 brings up a point that there are different ways to score based off of the chain, but I think that this is irrelevant. There are different ways to score , but we don't need different tags for all of the possible ways. In fact, nearly all of the tags have variations (including , which can be scored by bytes or characters)

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Disclaimer: I added the tag

No

After looking through , even though most don't have a standard winning criterion tag most fit the definition of :

A code challenge is a competition for creative ways to solve a programming puzzle with an objective winning criterion not covered by other scoring tags (e.g. code-golf).

Also, the winning criterion in many non-winning-criterion-tagged challenges varies wildly (50th answer, second-to-last, last answer, etc.), so I think should require , , etc.

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No

I am of the opinion that a winning-criterion tag should describe the problem that participants would have to solve. For example, involves golfing code, involves creating a bot, etc.

is a bit of an exception, as it simply describes "anything that's not covered by other tags." But I think it still makes a valid tag.

, on the other hand, does not describe exactly what problem would be solved. Participants know that they will have to work off of previous answers in some way, but the exact problem can come in a variety of forms. Therefore, this tag can't be used as a winning criterion. questions should come with a more specific winning criterion, as well as some other tags (such as or ) to describe what it's about.

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