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Based on information in this post I feel I should try and validate all answers to my challenges. That hasn't proved too hard so far which is good, but Dennis's answer here technically wins the criteria of the challenge, but I cannot actually validate it.

The information in this post doesn't really seem to hold an answer so I thought I'd pose this question.

Since I can't (and nobody can) test this answer, is it ineligible to win the challenge?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Your question at the end is a lot more specific than the title implies. Do you want answers about the specific case or the general one? Also, just for the record, you don't need to accept any answer at all. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Mar 23 '18 at 8:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Accepting as in green checkmark and +15, or as in allowing it to be valid? \$\endgroup\$ – user202729 Mar 23 '18 at 8:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MartinEnder I'd intented to ask a general question, but I wanted to use the specific example to understand it better. Not accepting an answer at all is a fine solution I suppose! \$\endgroup\$ – Dom Hastings Mar 23 '18 at 8:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user202729 Accepting as in green check mark, but I suppose this would question if languages like Lenguage, that can't actually have a physical source file that can be used at all, as valid languages. I understand the implementation can be validated by feeding a number into the interpreter, but technically that's not a pre-existing interpreter (although I guess one exists that can accept either the large number or the source?) \$\endgroup\$ – Dom Hastings Mar 23 '18 at 8:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ We have no rule that "askers must accept questions" or "askers must accept the best solution". You're of course allowed to accept an suboptimal solution. \$\endgroup\$ – user202729 Mar 23 '18 at 8:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user202729 Askers don't have to accept answers, but if they do, the accepted answer is the answer that wins the challenge. \$\endgroup\$ – Dennis Mar 23 '18 at 12:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Dennis It's not in the starry night challenge. \$\endgroup\$ – user202729 Mar 23 '18 at 13:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user202729 It's not like we can do anything about it if someone decides to accept a different answer. But you're supposed to accept the winner if you do. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Ender Mar 23 '18 at 15:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ I edited your question a bit - there is a reference implemetation of lenguage. It's not going to ever finish, but the language isn't just 'theoretical'. \$\endgroup\$ – Rɪᴋᴇʀ Mar 26 '18 at 21:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Riker Yeah, so I know that exists, but since the programs can't be run, surely that makes it theoretical? \$\endgroup\$ – Dom Hastings Mar 27 '18 at 4:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just because the answer is theoretical, doesn't mean it's not verifiable. You can still figure out how a program will act even if you can't run it. Each part of Dennis' answer is recognisable in what it does, and the end result is valid. \$\endgroup\$ – Jo King Mar 27 '18 at 5:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JoKing Agreed, ibjustnknow on the last answers that will never complete on existing hardware are not acceptable. So I was seeking clarification. I guess it varies question to question. \$\endgroup\$ – Dom Hastings Mar 27 '18 at 12:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DomHastings they can be run, and small programs can definitely be completed. It just takes a long time. Longer programs, like the answer in question, can't, but that does'nt make the whole language theoretical. \$\endgroup\$ – Rɪᴋᴇʀ Mar 27 '18 at 15:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ The Lenguage program can be converted to BF and then you can run and test that program. \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Apr 2 '18 at 13:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ Lenguage has an actual interpreter, so Lenguage answers can be submitted. But I'm saying that a language where the only actual interpreter is to run some output in another language isn't valid. Hence why interpreter has "air-quotes" around it. \$\endgroup\$ – mbomb007 Apr 2 '18 at 14:17

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