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When golfing in Excel, it is often possible to omit closing parentheses at the end of an expression. Excel will detect this, add the missing closing parentheses and ask if this is what was meant.

Should any such trailing parentheses be counted for and challenges or not?

  • On the side of allowing it is that the code without the missing characters is enough for Excel to understand (though it requires a button press or mouse click to do so).

  • On the side of prohibiting it is that the code is invalid, and that Excel will refuse the formula if one rejects the suggested fix.

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Yes, it should be valid

If languages like 05AB1E and other golfing languages have implicit bracket closing (albeit, without making any noise, so to speak), then Excel should be allowed to do it too.

Anything that gives a correct result after Excel's typo fixer works its magic should be allowed.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't have any thoughts on the conclusion of this answer but I think the logic behind it is very poor. For one it seems that this logic could be applied to any language, which leads to some undesirable results. For two golfing languages and Excel are pretty different in a lot of ways, but most importantly Excel autofills missing parens while these languages just don't require them. \$\endgroup\$ – Ad Hoc Garf Hunter Jun 27 at 14:25

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