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The Code Golf FAQ says, "You should only ask practical, answerable questions". "Answerable" I get, but isn't code golf by its nature impractical, but fun. Aside from the impracticality of minimizing source code length, many of the puzzles that one can solve when golfing may have practical applications, but what about ones that do not? Are they off limits?

I wonder whether the "practical" blurb is Stack Exchange boilerplate text that accidentally got copied over.

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marked as duplicate by Rɪᴋᴇʀ, Mego, 0 ', Sriotchilism O'Zaic, Gurupad Mamadapur Feb 2 '17 at 11:25

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yep. That's boilerplate that we've inherited from the rest of the stack exchange network. On graduated site moderators have some power to edit that kind of thing, but I don't see the magic button here and now. \$\endgroup\$ – dmckee Mar 16 '13 at 17:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ There's no point asking for the shortest program which proves Goldbach's conjecture within 2 hours on a Raspberry Pi. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Taylor Mar 16 '13 at 19:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ I added the bug tag so that this item gets tracked toward completion. \$\endgroup\$ – Edward Brey Mar 21 '13 at 21:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Related: meta.codegolf.stackexchange.com/q/477/152 \$\endgroup\$ – AShelly Aug 2 '13 at 18:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Gosh...I sure hope no one's asking a practical question...one they would actually use. Shudder. \$\endgroup\$ – Paul Draper May 25 '14 at 0:22
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You can learn a lot about a languages features by the very act of golfing. I feel that knowledge for knowledges' sake is actually beautiful just as Mathematics is. I don't think code that has no practical applications should be off limits. The sheer challenge alone is an art form to be admired.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Agreed, I've learned more about list comprehension from golf than I have from tutorials. Golf is all about making terse code, it takes it to extremes, but it is a beneficial exercise. \$\endgroup\$ – user8777 Aug 16 '13 at 6:51
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That depends. Code golf questions usually tend to not require a huge amount of mathematical (or chemical, biological etc.) knowledge and therefore code golf is usually not about solving real world problems. Code golf is trickery. That's all it is, and that's the way it's supposed to be. It's like solving sudoku puzzle. It's hard, it's fun, it helps a little for real world stuff, but it's more hacking than solving.

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