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A while ago I ended up on a StackOverflow question which I believe could fit under category as it's all about killing the idea a C program could beat anything else in speed (here the main competitor is mawk for text processing with regexes).

As there's already been a wide meta-effect on this question on SO, I'm unsure it would be on-topic there or not, so before writing a challenge about it I have two questions:

  1. Would it be on-topic (and with which tag ?)
  2. Is the test system in place (github+travis) valid to classify answers

Side Note: Would the test system be of some interest for other challenges ?

P.S: Tell me if I should copy here parts of the existing SO and Meta-SO questions to ease the understanding (but the subject is quite vast now and I'm afraid making this one too long by overquoting)

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    \$\begingroup\$ A King of the Hill is a game or competitive challenge with interaction between competitors (like Checkers or Tank Wars). If you're going for "what's fastest", there is a fastest-code tag that sounds more appropriate. \$\endgroup\$ – Geobits Nov 19 '15 at 14:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Editing, after reading too much around I used the wrong tag ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Tensibai Nov 19 '15 at 14:42
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Sandbox it and see

Go ahead and write up a sandbox post. We'll give you critique on what is unclear, what should be changed, etc. It's much easier to answer "is this a good challenge" when looking at a fleshed-out sandbox post than a short description here. If it works, great! If not, oh well, you've (hopefully) learned something for the future.

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Yes.

We like problems.

In the future, if you want to identify whether a problem is feasible, we have a friendly chat room that would love to critique your problem (as posting that on meta seems kind of overkill IMO).

Edit: I'm not indicating that your post here is off-topic or that we have rules against issues that are "too small", just that I would personally ask in chat.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Aww, used to meta SO where questions out of scope for main are the best place to go. \$\endgroup\$ – Tensibai Nov 19 '15 at 14:47

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