24

Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of esolang creation! I think it's a very fun meta-game part of PPCG to make new languages, and it's one that I enjoy a lot. I'm certainly not an expert on the topic, but I have made two languages before. Here are some tips I'd give you. Keep in mind that all of these are optional: Mention it in The Nineteenth Byte ...


17

Answered in order Yes They are different versions. Maybe It would depend upon the challenge in question. Some specify that major versions (e.g., Python 2 vs Python 3) are considered the same language, some have them different. No Just like how Perl and other languages get certain flags "default" for free, the same would be for this. If it's required ...


14

The language would have been created on the date at which the book was bookmarked for the first time The Library of Babel is basically an encoding scheme: any possible string will exist somewhere in the Library, and the string itself is specified by a book location and page number. For example, the book you linked is located at: Hexagon ...


12

We already have a consensus that functions have to be reusable arbitrarily often. While that consensus arose in the context of side effects (such as changing global variables in a way that prevents the function from working more than once), I think we should apply it to this situation as well. 1+_* is not a function. Yes, it operates on the top of the ...


12

Yes you can - you do however have to make sure that it is clear what transpiler you used as well as the interpreter/compiler of the language you transpile into you use.


8

Yes It is quite common for participants here to use their own languages, and indeed, some of the languages used here (e.g. NARS2000 and TI-Basic) cannot be tried online.


6

The UTF-8 representation allows the code to be human-readable (to the extent that this is possible for a dedicated golfing language) while being able to be scored by "number of characters". Since our default is to count bytes, golfing languages have an incentive to use all 256 bytes. Having a printable representation for each of them is just ...


6

Yes, but an interpreter or compiler is required Languages on this site are defined by their implementation. This means that there has to be an interpreter/compiler (online or offline) in which programs can be run. Obviously, it is most convenient if the program can be run online (such as in Try It Online), but it is perfectly acceptable if the interpreter/...


5

Sure. Why not? Who cares where a language came from? If I had a PRNG output a bunch of random characters and that happened to make a valid language, there's no reason I shouldn't be able to use that. Languages invented by the library of babel aren't too different. However, if you answer a challenge in the language ",fkwpival.vbfz", because that book ...


4

Prepare a very short description of the language's features and goals, no more than a few sentences. Give some non-trivial examples with a hint for what they do as a comment. Say how your language is different from the myriad of already existing langauges and why anyone should pay attention to it. Name it something googlable.


4

This needs to be handled on a case-by-case basis, but looks fine here. We shouldn't make a blanket statement that interpreter flags define a new language version. This runs in to the MetaGolfScript problem, where different languages essentially encode part of the code. In this case, however, the languages are substantively different, so I think it's fine.


4

Your language isn't compelling as-documented I've read all the documentation currently available on GitHub, and the language appears to have many undocumented features, and those undocumented features include the things that make it unique. Right now the only documented capabilities I can find are basic math in an interactive environment. I can't even find ...


3

Most Certainly Yes Some examples of users using their own programming language: Me, using Keg @a'_', using W @Adnan, using 05AB1E @Dennis, using Jelly @BusinessCat, using Gaia @Mego, using Actually/Seriously @ASCII-Only, using Charcoal @sporeball, using naz @isaacg, using Pyth


3

As long as the language you mean to use falls into PPCG's definition of a programming language, you're free to use it. As Nathan pointed out, PPCG doesn't even require you to answer in a programming language, so yes, feel free to use whatever language you like. Regarding what you should call it, there's no specific answer to that. As Pavel suggested, you ...


2

Because I had a few spare hours on my hands, I wrote a simple parser / compiler / whatevs that will effectively solve all the problems of this post: The new language will take input as line-by-line from STDIN (which is allowed) and will hardcode it into a copy of the source program which then gets fed to CBMC. The output of which gets redirected to a file, ...


2

Just addressing number 2 I agree with AdmBorkBork on all the other answers so I am just going to respond to the second question you ask. Yes You can make a polyglot between them. As I see it there are two types of polyglots Polyglots where different languages output different results Polyglots where different languages output the same result The first ...


1

Designing languages for golfing requires a good amount of exposure to golf problems such that you can create a list of useful structures that you would like to abbreviate. Trivial example constructs are filter, map, zip and reduce operations and various variants of those operations. The most obvious thing is to pack as much functionality into a single ...


1

This is the example given in the linked answer, but in reality, 1+_* is a function, and {1+_*} is a function that pushes a function to the stack You seem to be assuming the answer you want within the "question", but your working definition of function is certainly open to debate. The reason that the linked answer to the primary meta question on this subject ...


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