65

Trust the community and add a standard loophole I think the community can handle the add-a-builtin problem (I may be very wrong). I think that if someone adds a feature to their language that is clearly meant to only solve one particular challenge, the community will probably downvote that answer into oblivion. However, I still think we need a rule against ...


17

Yes Non-competing doesn't allow an answer to do what it wants, and not meet the questions specifications. If a question has a specific scoring system, answers whose scores can't be calculated shouldn't be marked non-competing, they should be removed from the question. In short, if I posted an answer to the Hello, World! question that didn't display Hello, ...


12

Keep them ...assuming they've shown any sort of effort. As caird coinheringaahing mentions, a serious contender is one that: ...makes a serious effort towards optimizing the submission's score within the chosen language(s) and other choices (such as algorithm choice or optional restrictions/bonuses taken). [emphasis added] I would argue that the answer in ...


11

Please Don't Correct me if I'm wrong, but how often do really old posts show up on the front page? Unless you keep editing them, not very often. So, now that the new decree has been set in place, let's just ignore the old posts and apply the policy to the new ones. I'm not saying that you're not allowed to edit a single post, but don't go looking through ...


9

PPCG code-golf should not be considered an individual competition. Because PPCG solutions are publicly displayed, many users peek at solutions by others in their language. Suppose Alice, a Jelly programmer, writes a 20-byte answer to some challenge. Bob glances at the byte count, thinks he can outgolf her, and finds an 18-byte solution. Finding it too ...


8

Also, ad hoc languages only hurt the ad hoc-er, not the community Another point is this. The whole idea behind competitions on this site is not to determine who is the Best or the Smartest. It's to give individuals a hurdle to leap over, so that they can maybe learn something new or even just exercise the ol' gray cells. If a person decides to make a new ...


3

why is competitiveness important? It's not, really. We need some kind of scoring criterion, and going by byte count is simple, objective, and easy to measure in (almost) every language, but is still enough of a departure from the way code is normally written that it poses a unique challenge. That most languages don't get more than one answer on a given ...


2

Yes - I think that new language should be allowed to win. The initial intention of language itself is to provide smooth way to express, simplify, shorten, improve how code or communication looks like. If language itself takes a fresh approach on how to better adapt to problem, context, program - that should be encouraged, not rejected. However - creating new ...


2

Competitiveness does matter Anyone with a half-decent answer is never challenged. Incorrect. If it's decent but not at the level of "very good", generally people will comment improvements, or (rarely) submit their own if they use a significantly different approach. Just because they don't have their own answer does not mean they aren't competing. then ...


1

The consistent attitude with regard to the golf language situation is that for every challenge, each language is a category, and subsequently there is a 'winner' for each language. ... If there is one winner for each language, and also one answer for each language, then by extension almost everyone is a winner. I agree with you that this interpretation is ...


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